Siegfried and Kriemhild part 4

Siegfried and Kriemhild part 4

Siegfried and Kriemhild part 4

They of Denmark were aghast when they heard their king was taken captive; they told it to his brother, who fell in a great fury by reason of the disaster.

So the mighty Ludgast was taken by Siegfried’s prowess, and given in charge to Hagen. When that good knight heard that it was Ludgast he was not sorry.

They bade raise the standard of Burgundy. “Forward!” cried Siegfried. “More shall be done or the day end, if I lose not my life. The Saxon women shall rue it. Hearken now, ye men of the Rhine. I can lead you to Ludger’s army. There ye will see helmets hewn by the good hands of heroes. They shall be in evil case or we turn again.”

Then Gernot and his men sprang to horse. The banner was unfurled by Folker, the minstrel knight. He rode before the host, and they all made them ready for battle. They numbered not more than a thousand men, and thereto the twelve strangers. The dust rose from their path, and they rode through the land, their shield

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Siegfried and Kriemhild part 3

Siegfried and Kriemhild part 3

“Sit thou at home, O King,” spake Siegfried. “Since thy knights are willing to follow me, stay here by the women and be of good cheer; for, by my troth, I will guard for thee both goods and honor. I will see to it, that they that seek thee here at Worms by the Rhine bide where they are; we will pierce deep into their country, till their vaunting is turned to sorrow.”

They passed from the Rhine through Hesse against Saxony, where the battle was fought afterward. With plunder and with fire they laid waste the land, the which both the princes found to their cost.

When they were come to the marches, the warriors hasted forward, and Siegfried began to ask them, “Which of us shall guard the rest from surprise?” More to their hurt the Saxons never took the field.
They answered, “Let bold Dankwart guard the younger knights. He is a good warrior. So shall we come in less scathe by Ludger’s men. He and Ortwin shall guard the rear.”

“I mysel

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Siegfried and Kriemhild part 2

Siegfried and Kriemhild part 2

The king was heavy of his cheer, and Siegfried, the good knight, saw that he was downcast, but wist not the reason, and asked King Gunther what ailed him. “I marvel much,” said Siegfried, “that thou takest no part in our sports as heretofore.” And Gunther, the doughty knight, answered him, “Not to every man may I declare the secret heaviness of my heart; only unto true friends shall the heart tell its dole.”

Siegfried changed color, and grew red and white, and he said to the king, “I have denied thee naught, and now I would help thee. If thou seekest friends, I will be one of them, and stand to it truly to my life’s end.”

“Now God requite thee, Sir Siegfried, for I like thy word; and albeit thy might availed me nothing, I would rejoice none the less that thou art well minded toward me; as much and more will I do to thee if I live. I will tell thee the cause of my trouble. Envoys from my foemen have brought a message that with an army they will

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Siegfried and Kriemhild part 1

Siegfried and Kriemhild part 1

Anonymous: End of 12th Century

The unknown writer of the Nibelungenlied, or Lay of the Nibelungs, was an Austrian. Nothing is known of him except that he wrote his celebrated ballad epic toward the end of the Twelfth Century.

Rediscovered toward the end of the Eighteenth Century, the Lay is, in the words of Prof. Calvin Thomas, “a powerful poem and a human document of many sided interest.” The component episodes are related with great vivacity, and the characters developed by means of a powerful imagination. The Lay was founded upon earlier versions of various legends, traditions, and songs that were current in pre-Christian times. Many of the same stories are found in the two Icelandic Eddas and in the Volsunga Saga.

The present version comprises two chapters, or “Adventures” (the fourth and fifth) of The Fall of the Nibelungs, translated by Margaret Armour, Everyman’s Library. Reprinted by permission of the publishers, J. M. Dent and Sons. T

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Phrygian Valley

Phrygian Valley

Despite the proliferation of supermarkets, people in the
cities of the Phrygian Valley still meet their needs from the traditional
grocery stores, which supply staples like village bread, water buffalo ‘kaymak’
(clotted cream), and poppy seed flour. Gold meanwhile is still sold as the
primary form of investment and, especially in summer, gold jewelry is
traditionally given as a wedding present. The local alabaster is used in
souvenir items such as necklaces, bracelets and pipes.

Turkish Airlines has Istanbul- Eskisehir flights in both
directions.

When speaking of Afyonkarahisar, the first that leap to mind
are poppies, sucuk and of course that inseparable duo, the city’s trademark
shredded ekmek kadayif pastry with clotted cream.

A university city today, Eskisehir offers visitors a
children’s amusement park as well as newly opened shopping centers.

Kutahya is a resort area that attracts tourists summer and
winter with spas like those a

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Berlin

Berlin

A remnant of East Berlin that has crossed over to the West,
the famous ‘little traffic man ‘with a hat (Ampelmannchen) used at pedestrian
crossings in place of the usual red and green lights, has an important place in
the graphic arts.

Atilla Dorsay (Filmcritic)

“I’ve been going to Berlin for the film festival since 1978.

With its artists and festivals, it is a lovely city. Years
ago I went to Berlin two days late. Without even claiming my bag at the
airport, 1 dashed off to where the press conferences were being held. I wanted
to see and hear the immortal Fellini.

I made it, and it’s a good thing too because I never got
another chance to see Fellini. ”

The main crossing point between East and West Berlin during
the Cold War, Checkpoint Charlie today is a tourist attraction where visitors
have their photo taken with guides dressed in U.S. and Soviet army uniforms.

‘The Berlin Biennale adds enormous vital

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Dublin

Dublin

With its unique atmosphere, Dublin where life intertwines with art.

Dublin is situated in a basin where the River Liffey meets a
patch of the Atlantic Ocean known as the Irish Sea, an area simultaneously in
the foothills of emerald green mountains with myriad shades of green. As you
stroll through Dublin’s bustling streets, the city’s historic houses, built in
the traditional architectural style, create a warm atmosphere with their
colorfully painted doors. Life in Dublin’s streets is buzzing and full of
surprises, and the many street musicians, magicians, and other artists
displaying their fascinating skills mesmerize curious onlookers.

One of the city’s most vital hubs, O’Connell Street and
Square make an especially good destination for a stroll. This part of town also
boasts numerous examples of the Georgian style buildings that lend Dublin its
classical appearance. These buildings went up during the reigns of England’s
Kings George I and George IV

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Arbil

Arbil

Arbil route opens

Turkish Airlines recently started flights between Istanbul
and the city of Arbil in northern Iraq. The inaugural flight on the aircraft
Safranbolu took off from Istanbul at 9:30 a.m. and landed in Arbil at 11:30.

Present on the flight were Finance Minister Mehmet Simsek,
Energy and Natural Resources Undersecretary Metin Kilic and Turkish Airlines’
Board Chairman Hamdi Topcu as well as a large number of businessmen and members
of the press. Speaking at the ceremony in the northern Iraqi city of Arbil,
Simsek said, “The Turkish and Kurdish people have been together for a thousand
years. Nobody can break up our brotherhood. ”

In a talk he gave at the ceremony, Turkish Airlines’ Board
Chairman Hamdi Topcu pointed out that Arbil is the airline’s 135th destination
abroad and is now linked via Istanbul to 1,200 points around the world through
the Star Alliance Group.

It’s easier than ever to fly to the balkan coun

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Marrakesh Casablanca

Marrakesh Casablanca

Ahmet Bilal Arslan Photograher

“I’ve been going to Morocco since 2006 and my most interesting experience there was seeing the east of the Atlas Mountains. Unlike the ever popular Marrakesh and Casablanca, this area is still waiting to be explored in all its mystery. ”

Opening onto the Atlantic, the Caves of Hercules at Tangier bring to mind the map of Africa. It was at exactly this point that the Hercules of legend is said to have separated Africa from the European continent by creating the Strait of Gibraltar.

Built over the Atlantic Ocean at Casablanca, the Mosque of King Hassan II is considered the second largest in the world. Its 210-meter Maghreb-style minaret is an Islamic monument well worth seeing.

Recipient of long string of the world`s most prestigious industrial design awards, Dr. Hakan Gursu accesses the future of design and consumers` changing expectations.

Serdar Turan & Ahmet Bilal Arslan

What i

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Aladag Mountains

Aladag Mountains

How to go:

Turkish Airlines has daily flights in both directions between Istanbul and Kayseri. Once you are in Kayseri, you can reach the Aladag Mountains via Develi or Yahyali.

Where to stay:

If you can Y get to Kayseri, you can stay at a bed & breakfast in the village of Kapuzbasi.

What to eat:

There are rustic restaurants around the ancient Roman fountain in the Kayseri town of Develi.

The dish of choice at these venues shaded by century-old chinars is a kind of flat bread with meat (etli pide) known as Develi civikh.

Venice Biennale opened as usual in June. Artists, curators, journalists and collectors from around the world were in town for the opening on June 4.

The Biennale is also hosting a large and ambitious international exhibition. Curator this year is Bice Curiger, and the theme is ILLUMInations.

Turkey is taking part in the Biennale this year with Ayse Erkmen’s work titled Pl

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